Category Archives: Yoga

International Pickle Day

My life has gotten a bit hectic and I haven’t kept up with my blog schedule very well. For today, I had planned to celebrate National Love a Tree Day with a beautifully written entry about the beauty and necessity of trees as well as tree pose… but that’s not coming together. Time to switch to plan B. Instead, let’s celebrate International Pickle Day with a couple of silly songs because I feel like we could all use a little laughter.

First up, Mr. Arlo Guthrie and The Motorcycle Song, sometimes referred to as The Motorcycle Song (The Significance of the Pickle).

For some reason, thinking of this song brought another one to mind. Maybe it’s because Steve Goodman wrote City of New Orleans, which Arlo recorded, as well as our next selection. Here’s David Allan Coe with You Never Even Call Me by My Name. Even if you don’t like country music, you should listen until the last verse; I still laugh every time I hear it.

And just for kicks, here’s what is probably my most loved silly song: Roger Miller’s You Can’t Rollerskate in a Buffalo Herd. Good advice for us all.

May you put your mind to being happy,

Debra

 

National Etiquette Week

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National Etiquette Week is May 8 to 12 this year. I teach a quarterly Yoga Basics class and often get questions about etiquette in group yoga classes. Here are some tips based on those conversations.

What to wear. You don’t have to spend a lot of money on fancy yoga clothes. Wear something that is comfortable and that will allow you to move freely. You don’t need to wear form fitting yoga pants if you’re not comfortable in them, but you should wear something that allows the teacher to see the shape of your body in the poses to help with adjustments.

Yoga accessories. Students often ask about buying their own yoga mats and which one they should purchase. Most studios have mats available, so you don’t necessarily have to buy your own. If you do decide to buy your own mat, there are a number of inexpensive options at major retailers and there are also lots of more eco-friendly (and also more expensive) options available. When you’re ready to purchase your own mat, feel free to ask your teacher or other students for recommendations.

When & what to eat before class. The general rule of thumb is to avoid eating at least two hours before class. If you need to eat something due to scheduling conflicts or health issues, eat only something very light that won’t upset your stomach.

Don’t be stinky. It’s impossible not to sweat in most classes, especially hot ones, but it’s best to start out fresh and clean. And lest you think bad body odor is the biggest problem here, you’re wrong. Wearing perfume or other strong scents is the more common offense. Many folks have allergies or are sensitive to strong scents, so it’s best to avoid using perfumes before practicing.

Arrive early. Ten to 15 minutes before class is a reasonable time to arrive before a class. It gives you plenty of time to get your space, your props together, and get settled in. Arriving late is sometimes unavoidable but it is also very distracting — avoid it as much as possible.

Turn off your electronics. You don’t need your phone on your mat. Turn it off. A vibrating phone in a quiet yoga space is as distracting as a full-blast ringtone, so off is better than silenced or on vibrate. If there is a family or work emergency, let your teacher know, set up by the door, and step outside before answering.

Passing gas. Hey, it happens. Feel free to either laugh at yourself or keep moving right along. Everyone has (or will) do it at one time or another.

Don’t skip relaxation. Final relaxation is the most important pose in class. Some days, it’s easier than others to lie quietly, so don’t beat yourself up if you don’t find it easy or don’t really like it. If you absolutely have to leave class early, let your teacher know before class and leave as quietly as possible before final relaxation begins.

Enjoy yourself. Yoga is serious but it should also be enjoyable. Allow yourself the gift of time to do something good for you. Don’t stress about not being able to do everything at first. If a class is challenging, modify poses when necessary and take breaks when you need to. If you feel a class is too gentle, allow yourself to give your body a bit of a break. To paraphrase Paul Grilley, the only incorrect way to do yoga is to feel nothing or to feel pain.

See you on the mat,

Debra

Revenge of the Fifth

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Illustrations by Rob Ozborne

Yesterday we celebrated the light, and today we embrace the dark side. The poses:

Have fun today!

Debra

 

 

May the Fourth

Star-Wars-Montage-Yoga-Pose-Cartoons-4

Illustrations by Rob Ozborne

Introduce your inner geek to your inner yogi with this fun Star Wars-inspired yoga as drawn by Rob Ozborne.

The poses:

Celebrate the light and May the Fourth be with you,

Debra

National Pretzel Day

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National Pretzel Day is a great day to get free pretzels, but it also makes me think of the number of times that people tell me they’ve never done yoga because they “aren’t flexible enough” or they “can’t do those pretzel poses.” I usually have two responses to that: 1) saying you’re not flexible enough to do yoga is like saying you’re too dirty to take a bath, and 2) I’m not flexible either.

Yoga can be about doing incredible looking poses, if that’s what you’re into. It can also be about learning what your body and mind are capable of. It can be about whatever you want it to be. Just get on your mat and see what you find.

Peace,

Debra

National Gardening Month: Yoga for Gardeners, Part 3

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During this National Gardening Day, we’ve looked at poses to do before and during gardening. After a long day of bending, lifting, and working against gravity in the garden, a few poses to counteract the day’s activities are in order. Reclined poses allow gravity to work with the body rather than against, twists help tone the spine and loosen up the back, and elevating the feet helps release the stress of the day.

May all your flowers bloom,

Debra

 

National Frog Month

April is National Frog Month. Frogs are an important bellwether species for our planet — when frogs are healthy and abundant, an ecosystem is healthy. There a number of actions that both children and adults can do to help build awareness and improve the environment.

In honor of National Frog Month, I wanted to share one of my favorite yin yoga poses (second only to dragon pose for me). Here is more information about frog pose.

Frog (hold 3 to 5 minutes)

Contraindications

  • Bad back: use support
  • If there is any tingling in the fingers, take hands wider or extend one arm at a time

Getting into the Pose:

  • From all fours, spread the knees as wide as possible and sit back to heels
  • Arms can be at your side or stretched overhead
  • Rest chin or forehead on floor

Modifications

  • Can separate the feet as wide as the knees
  • Hips can come up and forward if the stretch is too intense
  • Support chest on bolster

Benefits:

  • Stretches groin, hamstrings and back
  • Aids digestion and eases cramps

Meridians & Organs Affected:

  • Liver, kidney, spleen, urinary bladder

Joints Affected:

  • Hips, lower back, shoulders

Chakras Affected:

  • First (muladhara)
  • Second (svadhistana)
  • Third (manipura)

Coming Out:

  • Come to child’s pose or slide forward onto belly, bringing legs together

Counterposes

  • Child’s pose
  • Apanasana

With joy,

Debra

National Gardening Month: Yoga for Gardeners, Part 2

PhotoGrid_1492565619518As National Gardening Month continues and gardeners get outside more and more, it’s important to remember to honor the body. Moving the body before going to work is important. So, too, is taking breaks to stretch out the spine and legs. Occasional breaks will, in the long run, allow for more time to be spent gardening.

Here are some suggestions for some simple yoga poses that can be done in the garden.

Enjoy your time outside!

Debra

 

National Gardening Month: Yoga for Gardeners, Part 1

PhotoGrid_1492214436739Yoga and gardening, aside from being two activities I enjoy, have a lot in common.

  • A garden only thrives when we tend to it. The same can be said for our health. A yoga practice can help us maintain our physical and mental well-being.
  • In gardening, you quickly learn that there is a connection between all systems. A plant only does well in the right soil, with the right amount of water, with the right sun exposure, and so on. Our bodies are the same way. An injury or imbalance in the hips may lead to back and/or knee pain. Stress can show up as tension in our shoulders, shortness of breath, and headaches. You have to work with more than one system to find balance.
  • Yoga and gardening can reveal something new every day. Each day in the garden brings changes to plants, both good and bad. You might have plants suddenly budding out or you might have weeds suddenly popping up everywhere. In our yoga practice, you can do the same pose every day and every day there will be something different about it; some days it may be easy and some days it may be hard. I love that.
  • If you’re a gardener, you likely know to prep your soil before starting. But do you prep your body for the physical exertion you’re about to do? A little yoga before, during, and after gardening won’t keep all aches and pains away, but it will likely help them go away faster. Click here for some gentle before-gardening poses (and watch this site for some during and after poses later this month).

Meet you in the garden,

Debra

 

 

 

Restore from St. Paddy’s Day

Hope everyone had a fun and safe St. Patrick’s Day yesterday. Whether you partied and need to recover or would just like to add a gentle supportive pose to your yoga repertoire, a supported twist may be just what you need.

Holiday-Yoga-Supported-Twist

Image from Natural Awakenings

Supported Spinal Twist

Getting into the Pose:

  • Build a support with bolsters/blankets with or without blocks underneath
  • Use blankets under shoulders/legs and/or between legs
  • Sit next to a bolster with hips on the floor, one hip next to the bolster, and legs relaxed away from the bolster
  • Turn the torso so you face the bolster and let hands come to a rest on either side
  • Lengthen through the spine and drape your torso over the bolster

Modifications:

  • Knees closer to chest, intensifies the stretch in the lower back
  • Arms extended stretches armpits and shoulders
  • Turning the head away from the knees intensifies the stretch in the neck; turning the head toward the knees can be more gentle

Being There:

  • Relax space between shoulder blades
  • Exhale, release into twist
  • Inhale, create space
  • Feel the body lengthen over supports
  • Breathe quietly
  • Hold for 3 to 5 minutes per side

Benefits:

  • Relieves stress in backs, sides
  • Stretches muscles between ribs
  • Enhances breathing

Coming Out:

  • Bring hands under shoulders
  • Inhale come up

 

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